It is currently Thu Jul 16, 2020 1:42 pm (UTC [ DST ])



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
  Print view Previous topic | Next topic 
Author Message
 Post subject: St. Petersburg item
PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2007 7:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2007 6:00 pm
Posts: 36
I should much appreciate any information anyone can give me on the manuscript rates appearing on the front of this entire from Liverpool to St. Petersburg of July 1855. I presume that the black "2" refers to the amount due to the British Post Office. After studying my copy of the Moubrays' book, I am, however none the wiser about the marks in blue, i.e. the squiggle followed by "4 / 6"
Were these applied by the Prussians (in Aachen), or the Russians?


Attachments:
281_1.jpg
(716.83 KiB)
281_2.jpg
(644.43 KiB)
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Transfer from previous board: original post 392
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 7:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2007 6:00 pm
Posts: 36
Further to the above, as I understand it prepayment in postage stamps became compulsory on 1 August 1852. So how did this item get through without any such? Incidentally it is a single (very lightweight) sheet - an invoice in fact.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Transfer from previous board: original post 393
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 7:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Nov 07, 2007 7:00 pm
Posts: 44
It was not until 1875 that postage had to be paid in stamps for Foreign and Colonial mail.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: St. Petersburg item
PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2008 7:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2007 6:00 pm
Posts: 36
Thank you for that. Yes, I received the same information from another source, also that on the particular route in question that it was not necessary to prepay at all at that time! It was also suggested that the "2" was applied in Russia and that it was possibly the local delivery fee (2 kopeks?). However, the Moubrays' book states that "early covers of this period are handstamped with a black '3 1/2 GROSCHEN' - the amount to be repaid by Prussia to Britain." Could it be that this amount had by 1855 been reduced to 2 groschen and that no handstamp was available for whatever reason? The total rate, according to Moubray, was 11 1/2d. Also according to them, all covers of this period (1852-63) were marked in blue with either "4 / 3" or "3 / 4", although there is no explanation forthcoming of what these mean, whereas this one is definitely "4 / 6". So the mystery of the blue accountung marks remains.

Since I have at last elicited one response from the membership, is it too much to hope that another exists who possesses some vital piece of knowledge?


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group