It is currently Thu Aug 06, 2020 8:26 am (UTC [ DST ])



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
  Print view Previous topic | Next topic 
Author Message
 Post subject: Letter N as part of Postal Rate, 18th Century
PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 7:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 7:00 pm
Posts: 16
Please can someone explain the meaning of the letter N when applied within the postal rate e.g. '1 N 3' and '2 N' on mail sent in the late 18th Century? At first I thought it was an old version of 'Toys R Us' through the colloquial expressing of 'One 'n threepence' etc but this cannot be the case where shillings only are quoted. I would like to write up my examples but need the explanation if things are to make sense.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Transfer from previous board: original post 1888
PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 7:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 6:00 pm
Posts: 194
Hello there,
Can you post an example so we can see exactly what you mean?

We do not think we have seen that on any of our old letters, but we have some examples of manuscript charge markings in the book "For the Port and Carriage of Letters" by David Robinson.
Thanks
Eunice and Ron


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Transfer from previous board: original post 1889
PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 7:10 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 7:00 pm
Posts: 16
Example of '1 N 3' on letter dated 28 August 1786 from Hereford to London.


Attachments:
1889_1.jpg
(876.35 KiB)
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Transfer from previous board: original post 1890
PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 7:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Nov 11, 2007 7:00 pm
Posts: 57
Your original thoughts on this were completely correct! 1N3 means exactly that - 1(shilling) (a)N(d) 3(pence).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Transfer from previous board: original post 1891
PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 7:20 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Nov 11, 2007 7:00 pm
Posts: 57
Sorry - forgot to mention: Where there is obviously only an expression such as 1N - with no pence quoted - this merely means that there were no pence in the postal charge. It was done that way to avoid confusion between figures. 1N0 - meaning 1 shilling and zero pence - the 0 could easily be mistaken for a 6 when written at the speed these clerks had to work. Hope this helps...?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Transfer from previous board: original post 1892
PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 7:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 7:00 pm
Posts: 16
Thank you all for your help. Much appreciated. It is official that Toys R Us is not a 20th Century invention!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Transfer from previous board: original post 1893
PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 7:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 6:00 pm
Posts: 194
Hi Harvey
Thanks for that information. It has sorted us out before we could even answer.

We got the original query on our e-mail but we don't always get them that way, so check regularly on the 'board'.
Nice to see a swift response to a Postal History question.
Regards to all
Ron and Eunice.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group